Beef Gravy

5 from 3 votes

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You can use this easy, old-fashioned brown gravy recipe for all kinds of cuts of beef, from filet mignon to petite filet to roast beef to London Broil. 

Marinated Petite Filets

So you made a filet, or a beef tenderloin, or a roast eye of beef — what a great treat! The folks in your house must be so happy. But you want to take all of that flavor and notch it up a level. 

Those browned bits in the pan, left from searing and cooking the beef, also called the fond (used to make pan sauce, too), will become the base for an immensely flavorful beef gravy. This is that rich, smooth gravy you want to pour over beef — and hopefully, the mashed potatoes to go with it!

You can use this old-fashioned “brown” gravy technique for all kinds of cuts of beef, from filet mignon to petite filets to roast beef to London Broil. This savory brown gravy turns any cut of beef into a fantastic meal (please don’t forget the potatoes; suggestions for great sides with that gravy below!). Also, think of this method when you are searing and cooking other meat as well, like pork chops, chicken, and so on. Or, for a change of pace, try white gravy!

Marinated Petite Filets with beef gravy and cauliflower.

Beef Gravy: This smooth, rich pan sauce gravy is a quick way to enhance any seared or even roasted beef dish with just a few pantry ingredients.

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FAQs

What is beef gravy made of?

Beef gravy is usually made from the pan drippings created when cooking a cut of beef on the stove or in the oven. Nearly any gravy base is made with a thickener (like flour or cornstarch) and the pan drippings, and then that is thinned out and smoothed with the addition of the beef broth or stock. Add some onions, garlic, salt, and pepper for seasoning along the way.

How do you thicken beef gravy?

I like flour versus cornstarch, but you can use cornstarch if you have guests who are gluten-free. The flour is toasted in the drippings in a pan over the heat, which removes the raw flour taste. This is called a roux and forms the base of the gravy. Then, the broth is added while on the stove until it reaches the thickness you like after allowing it to simmer for a bit. If your gravy seems to be getting too thick, you can add a bit more hot beef broth or water to reach the desired consistency.

Is brown gravy the same as au jus?

Both brown gravy and au jus include the drippings from cooking the beef. Au jus also usually includes some beef stock or broth. However, au just doesn’t contain a thickener like flour or cornstarch and is much thinner in consistency.

How do you make gravy taste richer?

Using pan drippings enriches gravy, but to make beef gravy taste even better, you can also add things like wine, roasted garlic paste, and fresh herbs to the gravy for additional flavor. A dash of Worcestershire sauce, soy sauce, or miso paste adds more depth and umami, too. Also, try adding a splash of vinegar, like sherry vinegar, to brighten up the flavor.

How to Make Gravy With No Lumps

  1. Sprinkle the flour into the pan instead of dumping it all in.
  2. Make sure there are pan drippings or some fat in the pan, and whisk frequently so that the flour toasts and blends in smoothly. This will make a roux, which is the base for your gravy. Allow the flour to toast for a bit before adding the liquid.
  3. If you have a lot of fat in the pan, pour all of the drippings into a measuring cup and let sit at room temperature or in the fridge for 10 minutes or so. The fat will rise to the top, and you can pour some of it off so that you have the concentrated drippings left but not so much fat as to make the gravy greasy or oily.
  4. Add the liquid (broth, wine, water, stock) gradually and whisk constantly as you pour.
  5. Strain the gravy through a mesh strainer, pressing it through, discarding any solids left behind in the strainer.

How to Make Beef Gravy

  1. Leave the pan drippings in the pan: Once you have pan-seared and finished cooking your filet or other cut of beef, whether on the stove or in the oven, remove the meat, tent it with foil to keep warm, and don‘t clean that pan! Leave 3 tablespoons of the pan drippings in the pan, and drain off any extra oil.
  2. Sauté the aromatics: Return the pan with the drippings to medium heat. Sauté the garlic and onions in the butter for 3 minutes, until the vegetables have softened slightly.
Sauteing garlic and onions in beef drippings for gravy.
  1. Sprinkle over the flour: Whisk until the flour is incorporated into the base and toasted, about 2 minutes. 
Whisking flour into beef pan sauce in frying pan on the stove.
  1. Add the liquid: Pour in the red wine, if using, and whisk until it is mostly evaporated. Pour in the broth, stir, and scrape until the browned bits release from the bottom of the pan. Season and add the sherry vinegar, whisking until smooth. 
Stirring broth and red wine into pan of drippings to make beef gravy.
  1. Strain the gravy.
Straining brown gravy with fine-mesh strainer into bowl.
  1. Serve: You can offer the gravy warm on the side or drizzle the sauce over the meat.
Marinated Petite Filets with beef gravy on a plate with salad and cauliflower.

Reheating Leftover Gravy

When you store gravy, it will also thicken further in the refrigerator. Reheat it in a small pot over low heat, stirring frequently. You probably want to add at least a few tablespoons of broth or water to the pot as it warms. Gravy can also be reheated in the microwave, but give it a stir every 30 seconds so it heats evenly. You may want to lay a folded paper towel over the top of the gravy in a microwave-safe bowl to prevent splattering.

What Goes With Beef Gravy

This gravy pan sauce is a quick way to dress up any seared or even roasted beef dish with just a few pantry ingredients. And who isn’t excited about gravy?

What to Serve With Beef and Gravy

Potatoes! This gravy goes perfectly with a heap of mashed potatoes (or any kind of potatoes or grains). Try:

Also, serve Beef and Gravy with:

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5 from 3 votes

Beef Gravy

You can use this easy, old-fashioned brown gravy recipe for all kinds of cuts of beef, from filet mignon to petite filet to roast beef to London Broil. 
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 15 minutes
Servings: 6 people
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Ingredients 

  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 2 tablespoons minced red onion
  • 1 tablespoon minced garlic
  • 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • ¼ cup red wine
  • 1 cup beef or chicken stock
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper (to taste)
  • 3 tablespoons sherry vinegar

Instructions 

  • Once you have pan-seared and/or finished cooking your filets in the oven, remove the meat, tent it with foil to keep warm, and don‘t clean that pan! Leave 3 tablespoons of the pan drippings in the pan, and drain off any extra oil.
  • Return the pan to medium heat and melt the butter. Add the garlic and onions, and sauté, stirring frequently for 3 minutes, until the vegetables have softened slightly. Sprinkle over the flour and whisk until the flour is incorporated into the base and toasted, about 2 minutes. Add the red wine and whisk for a minute until it is mostly evaporated. Pour in the broth, and stir and scrape until the browned bits release from the bottom of the pan. Add salt and pepper and the sherry vinegar.  Whisk until smooth.
  • Pour the sauce into a mesh strainer and press the sauce through. Discard any solids left on the strainer.
  • Serve the sauce warm on the side, or drizzle the sauce over the meat.

Notes

Tips for the Smoothest Gravy
  • Sprinkle the flour into the pan instead of dumping it all in.  
  • Make sure there are pan drippings or some fat in the pan, and make sure you whisk frequently so that the flour toasts and blends in smoothly.  This will make a roux, which is the base for your gravy. Allow the flour to toast for a bit before adding the liquid.
  • Add the liquid (broth, wine, water, stock) gradually and whisk constantly as you pour.
  • Strain the gravy through a mesh strainer, pressing it through, and discarding any solids left behind in the strainer.

Nutrition

Calories: 61kcal, Carbohydrates: 3g, Protein: 1g, Fat: 4g, Saturated Fat: 2g, Polyunsaturated Fat: 1g, Monounsaturated Fat: 1g, Trans Fat: 1g, Cholesterol: 10mg, Sodium: 81mg, Potassium: 104mg, Fiber: 1g, Sugar: 1g, Vitamin A: 117IU, Vitamin C: 1mg, Calcium: 9mg, Iron: 1mg
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About Katie Workman

Katie Workman is a cook, a writer, a mother of two, an activist in hunger issues, and an enthusiastic advocate for family meals, which is the inspiration behind her two beloved cookbooks, Dinner Solved! and The Mom 100 Cookbook.

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