Plum and Nectarine Crisp

We have friends who have an orchard on their property. I want to say straightaway that I met Lisa and liked her extremely well from the get go, BEFORE I knew that she had an orchard. I would totally and completely and absolutely be friends with her with or without the orchard. But, the wonderful fact is that she and her family have an orchard.

Plum and Nectarine Crisp

The first time we went we staggered out with four bags of fruit, peaches, nectarines, plums, early apples and one doughnut peach. I promised to return some of the fruit in the shape of baked goods, and this crisp was the first thing I’ve made for them. But it wasn’t, nor will it be, the last (hint, hint).

Plum and Nectarine Crisp

There is just nothing like a streusel topping, which is basically another word for the topping of a crisp.  I almost would say that the topping is the real reason one makes a crisp in the first place, but that’s not quite true.  The topping is kind of the best part, but it only can become the best part of the crisp in combination with a tangy-tart-sweet filling below, moistening the bottom of the crisp.

Plum and Nectarine Crisp

Summertime fruit nestled under a buttery crunchy topping—the best dessert ever for those warm weather nights.

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This recipe makes a lot of streusel.  A LOT.  You will pile it quite high.  You’ll see that I mention placing a baking sheet below the pan filled with the crisp while the crisp is baking.  This is because unless you are using a very deep dish pie pan, or a baking dish large enough to hold the fruit filling and the topping, without the topping rising above the top of the pan, there may well be some dripping of the streusel over the side.  So, if you have a baking pan large enough to allow the streusel to remain below the rim, ignore that….but otherwise do trust me, it’s a smart move.

Plum and Nectarine Crisp

If you prefer to use a food processor to make the streusel, that’s another option for sure.  Just combine the flour, brown sugar and salt in the food processor, and pulse in the bits of cold butter until you have a pebbly consistency.  Turn the mixture into a bowl, and stir in the oats (so they don’t get all chopped up – yes this dirties more things.  You decide).

Plum and Nectarine Crisp

An ongoing question in the universe: to peel the fruit, or not?  I say with nectarines and plums, not.  Not worth the bother.  For peaches, usually yes, because of the fuzz.  use any combination of stone fruit here, it’s all good.

This is also the part where I would be remiss not to mention that vanilla ice cream or whipped cream are a kind of moral imperative here.

Plum and Nectarine Crisp

 

Why Would We Not Want to Make Crisps All the Time?

 

In other news….

 

Plum and Nectarine Crisp

Summer nestled under a crunchy topping with a touch of cinnamon.
Yield: 8 People
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 40 minutes
Cooling Time 15 minutes
Total Time 1 hour 10 minutes

Ingredients

  • 6 cups sliced nectarines and plums any combination
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
  • ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • ¾ cup all-purpose flour
  • ¾ cup brown sugar
  • ½ teaspoon kosher salt
  • ½ cup (1 stick) unsalted butter cold and cut into small pieces
  • 1 cup old-fashioned oats

Directions

  • Preheat the oven to 350°F. Butter a deep dish 9-inch pie pan or a baking dish large enough to hold the fruit, or spray with nonstick cooking spray
  • Place the nectarines and plums in the pie pan and sprinkle over the lemon juice and the cinnamon. Toss to combine.
  • In a medium bowl combine the flour, brown sugar and salt. Use your fingers, two knives or a pastry cutter to blend in the butter, so that the mixture has a lightly bumpy consistency. Stir in the oats. Distribute the topping over the fruit. Place a foil or parchment paper lined rimmed baking sheet on the lower rack of an oven, then place the pie on a rack in the middle of the oven.
  • Bake for about 40 minutes until the fruit is bubbling and the top is browned. A knife should slide easily into the plums (cover the crisp with foil if the top is browning too much before the fruit is cooked). Cool for 15 to 30 minutes on a wire rack, and serve warm with vanilla ice cream.

Nutrition Information

Calories: 309kcal | Carbohydrates: 48g | Protein: 4g | Fat: 13g | Saturated Fat: 7g | Cholesterol: 31mg | Sodium: 154mg | Potassium: 292mg | Fiber: 3g | Sugar: 29g | Vitamin A: 711IU | Vitamin C: 7mg | Calcium: 34mg | Iron: 1mg

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Comments

  1. This is the most AMAZING desert! I love the oatmeal topping and the fact you do not sugar the fruit. It allows the fruit to stand on its own. My husband went absolutely crazy for this and it is now a summertime fav. THANK YOU!!!

  2. This is one of the VERY BEST deserts I have ever made! I have made it twice in the past 2 weeks! My husband and friends LOVE IT!!! Some say it reminds them of rhubarb. It is SO lovely…the oats, brown sugar topping with cinnamon, the fruit is not cloyingly sweet…just fresh…with the fruits’ natural flavor shining through! The first time I made it, I followed the recipe proportions and made it in a pie plate. The second time, it increased it by 1/2 in a glass rectangular baking dish ( for leftovers). It was PERFECT!!! Whether you serve it warm with vanilla ice cream or cold with a little yogurt or creme fresh, it is WONDERFUL!!!! Thank you SO MUCH for sharing this amazing recipe!!!

    1. you don’t have to! with peaches I like to peel, because of the fuzziness, but it’s really not necessary with these thin skinned fruits (unless you determine that the skin seems thick or tough).

  3. I’m a little late to finding this recipe, but am so excited to try it! I got an ‘ugly fruit bag’ from the supermarket today and it was packed with nectarines and plums! Is it possible to sub lime juice for the lemon juice or will that throw off the flavor?

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