Italian Tuna Salad

A mayo-free version of one of our favorite foods.

mayo free, tuna, tuna sandwich
Serving Size: Makes 6 sandwiches, or serves 6

Italian Tuna Salad / Katie Workman / themom100.com / Photo by Cheyenne Cohen

I don’t know that I would have made this for my family had we not been stuck in the house during an icy rain lock down day. It was one of those moments where you take your life, or at least your vertical status, in your own hand by merely walking outside. I felt very badly for the dog, who needed to not only go outside but to do his thing outside on a day like this.

I also felt bad for the person who has to take him thusly (including myself) at 7 a.m. and 10 p.m. in particular.

Healthy Italian Tuna Salad Recipe / Katie Workman / themom100.com / Photo by Cheyenne Cohen

Do you have some ingredients that you use so often, and depend on so much you can’t imagine running out of them?   I have a lot of them. Things that I lay in ridiculous supplies of that might make you think I am running a small restaurant.  Popcorn kernels, olive oil, pasta, rice, vinegar, mustard….it’s a very long list, actually. And on that list is mayonnaise.

Italian Tuna Salad Sandwich Recipe / Katie Workman / themom100.com / Photo by Cheyenne Cohen

This story is getting long and quite boring, but (I’m almost done), the impetus for this new recipe was that I was (spit it out, girl) shockingly out of mayonnaise. But I had cans of tuna (another full on staple). So the usual tuna salad that I make for my family, the one in The Mom 100 Cookbook, was not going to happen.

What happens when you run out of mayo but really want tuna? This happens.Click To Tweet

Italian Tuna Salad No Mayo / Katie Workman / themom100.com / Photo by Cheyenne Cohen

I happen to love Italian tuna salad, tuna bound together with a lick of olive oil, jammed with onions and capers and olives and the like. But would everyone else? Springing a new version of an old favorite on a group of housebound people is risky business.  And the tuna fish sandwich is kind of sacrosanct in our house.  (Don’t even get me started on the tuna melt, which elicits lots of love and strong opinions)

Mercifully the answer was yes. And mercifully this little intro tale is now at a close.

Which Tuna to Buy:

If you buy the tuna in oil, you’ll still want to drain it, and add fresh extra virgin olive oil, but you’ll may want to start with 1 tablespoon. Also, I happen to love the mix of white and light tuna together, and prefer to buy my tuna in water, but you may have different feelings about what kind of tuna you prefer, and how you like it packed.

Make Ahead

Italian Tuna Salad will keep for 4 days in the fridge. Also know that if you store the tuna for a day or more it might dry out a bit as the tuna absorbs the dressing, so it might need a splash of olive oil to loosen it up. Or if you want it tangier, even a splash of vinegar, too.

 

Mayo Free Tuna Salad / Katie Workman / themom100.com / Photo by Cheyenne Cohen

Other Sandwich Friendly Salads:

Smoky Chipotle Chicken Salad

Grilled Chicken Caesar Salad Wraps

Salmon Salad with Jalapeno Scallion Dressing

The World’s Best Tuna Melt (this is the mayo version of tuna salad)

Italian Tuna Salad / Katie Workman / themom100.com / Photo by Cheyenne Cohen

Italian Tuna Salad

A mayo-free version of one of our favorite foods.
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Italian
Servings: 6 People
Calories: 193kcal
Author: Katie Workman

Ingredients

  • 2 5-ounce cans solid white tuna
  • 2 5-ounce cans chunk light tuna
  • 1/4 cup sundried tomatoes drained if in oil, soaked in hot water for 10 minutes then drained if dried
  • 2 shallots minced (about 3 tablespoons)
  • 1 cup baby spinach leaves
  • ½ cup green olives with pimentos
  • 1 tablespoon capers drained
  • Freshly ground pepper to taste
  • 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil or more if desired

Instructions

  • Drain the tuna and place in a medium-sized mixing bowl.
  • In a food processor, pulse the sundried tomatoes, shallots, spinach, olives, capers, pepper until roughly blended.   Then add the red wine vinegar and olive oil and pulse until combined. Add the dressing to the tuna and toss until combined. Taste and adjust seasonings as needed. Add more olive oil if it looks dry.
  • Serve a scoop of lettuce, or on green salad, or make this into sandwiches.

Notes

If you buy the tuna in oil, you’ll still want to drain it, and add fresh extra virgin olive oil, but you’ll may want to start with 1 tablespoon. Also, I happen to love the mix of white and light tuna together, and prefer to buy my tuna in water, but you may have different feelings about what kind of tuna you prefer, and how you like it packed.
This tuna will keep for 4 days in the fridge. Also know that if you store the tuna for a day or more it might dry out a bit as the tuna absorbs the dressing, so it might need a splash of olive oil to loosen it up. Or if you want it tangier, even a splash of vinegar, too.

Nutrition

Calories: 193kcal | Carbohydrates: 5g | Protein: 24g | Fat: 8g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Cholesterol: 34mg | Sodium: 430mg | Potassium: 437mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 2g | Vitamin A: 589IU | Vitamin C: 4mg | Calcium: 31mg | Iron: 2mg
Tried this recipe?Mention @katieworkman100 or tag #dinnersolved!

Italian Tuna Salad: Tuna bound together with a lick of olive oil, jammed with onions and capers and olives. You\'ll never miss the mayonnaise. #tuna #fish #tunafish #mayofree #nomayo

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