Swiss Chard, Leek and Feta Bruschetta

5 from 2 votes

This post may contain affiliate links. Please read our disclosure policy.

This gorgeous colorful medley of vegetables is delicious atop a olive oil slicked piece of toast. Crumbled cheese on top is another pop of texture and flavor.

Swiss Chard, Leek and Feta Bruschetta
Swiss Chard, Leek and Feta Bruschetta on a wooden board.

First of all, any time you can say the words feta bruschetta, it’s pretty much a good day.

This is just a tangle of deliciousness perching atop a little slab of toasted bread. I would ruin my dinner for this any day. Actually, this really just would be dinner, and rightfully so.

Swiss Chard, Leek and Feta Bruschetta lined up on a wooden board.

Cooking Rainbow Chard

I cannot walk buy a bunch of rainbow chard at a market without buying it. How do all of those colors happen? More about chard right here. The colors get a little muted as they cook, which is a little disappointing, but they are still gorgeous. 

Woman adding cranberries to a skilled of swiss chard and leek.

So, you just saute up those leeks, and chard and garlic in a skillet until it is wilted and beautiful. Then, in go the cranberries. More dried cranberries if you want, or not at all. Love the little pop of color and chew and tartness in this bruschetta. But I’m always walking the line between what I like, and what my kids find downright confusing or a deal breaker. And so it goes.

Just before (or just after, it really matters not much) you pull the vegetables from the heat, stir in the feta so it gets distributed in and starts to lightly soften and melt a touch. I prefer to keep the crumbles somewhat whole, because I love the way it looks with the bits of white and red peeking out from amidst the green, and the tiny pockets of salty deliciousness the feta bring to the equation.

Woman putting feta into a skillet with swiss chard and leeks.

Don’t assemble the bruschetta until you are about to serve them—they can sit for about 20 minutes or so, but then the bread might start to get soggy.

How to Use Leftover Bruschetta Topping

This sauteed Swiss chard/leek/feta jumble is really delicious as a bruschetta but there was a lot of it, and the leftovers made some encore performances. So first of all, a very interesting side dish! And then – it went into a quesadilla. The cranberries were even more unexpected then (sorry boys), but kind of fun. I also would use this mixture as the base of a frittata, but in that case, I might skip or pick out the cranberries. In this particular instance I agree with the boys –  I think that they would seem out of place.

Woman stirring a skillet of Swiss Chard, Leek and Feta.

Other Great Crostini & Bruschetta Recipes:

Also Read: What’s the Difference Between Bruschetta and Crostini? and Happy Holidays! An Open House Party.

Smoked Salmon Crostini with Herbed Mayonnaise

Pin this now to find it later

Pin It
5 from 2 votes

Swiss Chard, Leek and Feta Bruschetta

This gorgeous colorful medley of vegetables is delicious atop a olive oil slicked piece of toast. Crumbled cheese on top is another pop of texture and flavor.
Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 15 minutes
Total Time: 35 minutes
Servings: 12 Servings
Save this recipe!
We’ll send it to your email, plus you’ll get new recipes every week!

Ingredients 

  • 1 loaf ciabatta about 8 ounces or other country white bread, sliced – pick a bread that is no taller or wider than 3 or 4-inches, or cut the slices in half
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil plus more for brushing the baguette slices
  • Kosher salt to taste
  • 1 bunch Swiss chard preferably rainbow chard, rinsed and ends trimmed, excess water shaken off
  • 3 leeks trimmed and thinly sliced (white and light green parts only)
  • 1 teaspoon finely minced garlic
  • Freshly ground pepper to taste
  • ½ cup dried cranberries
  • 1 cup crumbled feta cheese

Instructions 

  • Preheat the oven to 375°F. Brush the slices of bread with olive oil, sprinkle with salt and bake for about 5 minutes until they are a touch golden around the edges, but not firm – they will firm up a bit as it cools. Transfer the bruschetta to a cooling rack or plate.
  • Remove the chard leaves leaves from the stems. Folding the leaves in half lengthwise, and then cut the leaf away from the stem. Thinly slice the stems and keep them separate. Roll the chard leaves in small stacks into a cylinder and cut them into ½-inch ribbons.
  • Heat the 2 tablespoons olive oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the leeks and saute for about 10 minutes until quite tender. Add the garlic and saute for 1 more minute, until you can smell the garlic. Add the chard stems and saute for about 5 minutes until the they are just tender. Season with salt and pepper, add the leaves and cook for another 5 to 8 minutes, until they are wilted and tender. You may need to add the leaves in batches, adding more as the chard cooks down. Stir in the dried cranberries (if using) and cook for another minute. Remove from the heat and stir in the feta. You want it nicely distributed and just a bit melty, but not totally melted into the greens as a sauce.
  • Distribute the chard mixture over the bread and serve either while the chard is still warm, or at room temperature.

Notes

How to Use Leftover Bruschetta Topping

This sauteed Swiss chard/leek/feta jumble is really delicious as a bruschetta but there was a lot of it, and the leftovers made some encore performances.  So first of all, a very interesting side dish! And then – it went into a quesadilla. The cranberries were even more unexpected then, but kind of fun. I also would use this mixture as the base of a frittata, but in that case, I might skip or pick out the cranberries. I

Nutrition

Calories: 170kcal, Carbohydrates: 26g, Protein: 5g, Fat: 5g, Saturated Fat: 2g, Cholesterol: 11mg, Sodium: 336mg, Potassium: 63mg, Fiber: 1g, Sugar: 5g, Vitamin A: 668IU, Vitamin C: 4mg, Calcium: 77mg, Iron: 1mg
Like this recipe? Rate and comment below!

About Katie Workman

Katie Workman is a cook, a writer, a mother of two, an activist in hunger issues, and an enthusiastic advocate for family meals, which is the inspiration behind her two beloved cookbooks, Dinner Solved! and The Mom 100 Cookbook.

You May Also Like:

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Recipe Rating




1 Comment

  1. Ghulam Mohyudin says:

    It was perfect the first time. I learn so much from you as well! Keep it up great post.