Miso Salmon

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Not counting a flexible marinating time, this miso salmon recipe takes 5 minutes to pull together, and 10 minutes to cook. The miso glaze is a perfect pairing with the rich salmon.

Miso Salmon

Glazing fish with a miso-based marinade is one of my favorite quick and easy ways to have a sophisticated fish dinner at home. The sweet, salty, umami-rich flavor of miso complements salmon perfectly. Plus, if you have a good basic Asian pantry, this marinade is available at any time, and it comes together in about 5 minutes of hands-on time. Just 5 minutes!

The marinating time is totally hands-off and very flexible. Then all you have to do is plan some easy sides like rice or sautéed broccoli, broil your fish, and dinner is served. Maybe start off with some seared Shishito Peppers.

Try to make sure the fish you choose is raised and harvested sustainably. The Seafood Watch site, run by the Monterey Bay Aquarium, is a great source of information about seafood sustainability. You can also look for Alaskan salmon, which is fished and processed using very sustainable methods.

Miso-marinated salmon on green plate with broccoli and rice.

Miso Salmon: Not counting the flexible marinating time, this takes 5 minutes to pull together, and 10 minutes to cook. The miso glaze is a perfect pairing with the rich salmon.

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Ingredients

Fresh salmon, mirin, sake, and other ingredients on marble.
  • Salmon – Salmon is a rich, firm, fatty fish, perfect for pairing with this miso marinade. With that said, other fish are also great options — I’ve tried it with Arctic Char and Halibut, and it has always turned out delicious!
  • Miso – Keep some miso on hand in the fridge — it lasts for a year, so don’t worry about having to use it up too quickly.
  • Toasted sesame oil – The same goes for toasted sesame oil. It’s a great, dependable basic that can be used in many dishes.
  • Ginger – Fresh ginger lasts for a while in the refrigerator, and I use it constantly, picking up a nice knob to make Asian food whenever I like. And don’t forget, learning how to cook with ginger properly means you definitely need to know how to peel fresh ginger with a spoon first.
  • MirinMirin is a sweet rice wine used almost exclusively in Japanese cooking.
  • Sake – There are a gazillion types of sake out there, and while you can use a fine one in this recipe, you can also use a lower-priced option with perfect results. Both sake and mirin will last for months and months, so if you buy them for this recipe, you don’t need to worry about using them up before they spoil.
  • Sugar – A spoonful of sugar helps lend a touch of sweetness to the glaze.
  • Vegetable oil – Use oil or nonstick cooking spray to make sure nothing sticks to your pan and save yourself a world of trouble when it comes to the dishes.
  • Scallions – To serve.
Broiled miso salmon in baking dish.

How to Make Miso Salmon

  1. Prepare the marinade: In a large-rimmed dish, whisk together the miso, mirin, sake, sugar, ginger, and sesame oil.
  2. Marinate: Add the salmon and turn the filets so they are well coated with the marinade. Refrigerate for at least 2 hours, up to 24.
  3. Cook the salmon: Preheat the broiler. Place the salmon on a prepared baking sheet, with at least ½-inch between each piece. Broil for 7 to 10 minutes, until golden brown.
  4. Serve: Sprinkle the salmon with the scallions and serve hot.
Miso Salmon with rice and broccoli on green plate.

FAQs

What is miso?

Miso paste is an ingredient made from fermented soybeans and used primarily in Japanese cooking. It has a rich, salty, umami taste. Miso comes in different varieties, which depend on the ingredients the soybeans were fermented with (usually rice or barley), and how long the miso has been fermenting. I used white miso in this recipe, which is a little more delicate than the darker varieties, but you can use any variety of miso you like. You can find miso in Asian grocery stores and online.

How long do I have to marinate miso salmon?

The longer the salmon is marinated, the deeper the flavor. However, the salmon doesn’t need to be marinated for that long to absorb some flavor.

What does the broiler do?

The broiler exists to provide pure, unadulterated heat, often at the end of your cooking time. In this dish, it allows the marinade to turn into a beautiful glossy browned glaze on top of the fish.

Table setting with broiled Miso Salmon on green plate with broccoli and rice.

What to Serve With Miso Salmon

Broccoli, rice, and broiled miso salmon on green plate.

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5 from 1 vote

Miso Salmon

Not counting a flexible marinating time, this miso salmon recipe takes 5 minutes to pull together, and 10 minutes to cook. The miso glaze is a perfect pairing with the rich salmon.
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 10 minutes
Marinating Time: 2 hours
Total Time: 2 hours 15 minutes
Servings: 4 People
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Ingredients 

  • ¼ cup white miso
  • ¼ cup mirin (rice cooking wine)
  • ¼ cup sake
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 2 teaspoons minced fresh ginger
  • 1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil
  • 4 (5 to 6-ounce) skinless salmon filets
  • Vegetable oil (for brushing the pan, or nonstick cooking spray)
  • Sliced scallions (to serve)

Instructions 

  • In a large-rimmed dish, whisk together the miso, mirin, sake, sugar, ginger, and sesame oil. Add the salmon and turn the filets so they are well coated with the marinade. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least 2 hours; if you can plan to marinate the fish overnight, all the better.
  • Preheat the broiler. Oil a baking dish, or spray with nonstick cooking spray. Remove the salmon from the marinade. Place them on the baking sheet, with at least ½-inch in between each piece. Broil for 7 to 10 minutes, until golden brown. Sprinkle the fish with the scallions and serve hot.

Notes

Miso paste is an ingredient made from fermented soybeans and used primarily in Japanese cooking. It’s got a rich, salty, umami taste. Miso comes in different varieties, which depend on the ingredients the soybeans were fermented with (usually rice or barley), and how long the miso has been fermenting. I used white miso in this recipe, which is a little more delicate than the darker varieties, but you can use any variety of miso you like. You can find miso in Asian grocery stores and online.

Nutrition

Calories: 350kcal, Carbohydrates: 17g, Protein: 36g, Fat: 13g, Saturated Fat: 2g, Polyunsaturated Fat: 5g, Monounsaturated Fat: 4g, Cholesterol: 94mg, Sodium: 829mg, Potassium: 878mg, Fiber: 1g, Sugar: 11g, Vitamin A: 83IU, Vitamin C: 0.1mg, Calcium: 31mg, Iron: 2mg
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About Katie Workman

Katie Workman is a cook, a writer, a mother of two, an activist in hunger issues, and an enthusiastic advocate for family meals, which is the inspiration behind her two beloved cookbooks, Dinner Solved! and The Mom 100 Cookbook.

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